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Windows is the most targeted operating system on the planet. That means you should fortify your PC’s defenses to stay safe both online and offline. This guide shows you how to enable or disable Secure Sign-In for Windows 10.

Secure Sign-In is an additional component on the Windows 10 login screen. It doesn’t prevent anyone from accessing your PC if they have your credentials. Instead, Windows 10 removes the login fields until you type a string of keys. After that, enter your password or PIN as usual.

This feature aims to thwart malware. Malicious code could reside in the background and spoof the Windows 10 login screen to capture your credentials. Because apps and programs typically don’t have access to the Ctrl+At+Del command, you can bypass the fake login screen by using Secure Sign-In that’s activated by typing this three-key command.

Enable or Disable Using the Netplwiz Command

To start, launch the Run command by pressing the “Windows” and “R” keys simultaneously (Windows+R). A small pop-up window will appear. Type “netplwiz” (without quotes) in the text field and then click the “OK” button (or press the Enter key) to continue.

Type netplwiz in Run Command

Alternatively, you can access the User Accounts panel by typing “netplwiz” into the taskbar’s search field and selecting the resulting Run command.

The User Accounts panel will appear onscreen. Click the “Advanced” tab (if it’s not loaded by default). Locate the “Require Users to Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete” option listed under “Secure Sign-In.” Check to enable or uncheck to disable.

Click the “Apply” button and then the “OK” button to finish.

User Accounts Set Secure Sign-In

Enable or Disable Using the Local Security Policy

Here’s another method that’s somewhat busier than following the User Accounts instructions. Use this method if you want to take the scenic route but avoid the Windows registry.

Launch the Run command by pressing the “Windows” and “R” keys simultaneously (Windows+R). A small pop-up window appears. Type “secpol.msc” (without quotes) in the text field and then click the “OK” button (or press the Enter key) to continue.

Type secpol in Run Command

Like before, you can also access the Local Security Policy panel by typing “secpol.msc” into the taskbar’s search field and selecting the resulting desktop app.

In the Local Policy Window, expand “Local Policies” listed on the left and select the “Security Options” subfolder underneath. Next, scroll down on the right and double-click the “Interactive Logon: Do Not Require CTRL+ALT+DEL” entry.

Local Security Policy Secure Sign-In

The entry’s Properties panel appears onscreen with the “Local Security Setting” tab displayed by default. Click a radio button to enable or disable this feature. Finish by clicking the “Apply” button and then the “OK” button.

Interactive Logon Secure Sign-In

Enable or Disable Using the Registry

If you want to take the hardcore route, why not edit the registry? Remember, tread lightly: Any changes you make could cause system instability. This option is for experienced individuals who enjoy digging deep into Windows.

RELATED: Windows Registry Demystified: What You Can Do With It

Launch the Run command by pressing the “Windows” and “R” keys simultaneously (Windows+R). A small pop-up window will appear. Type “regedit” (without quotes) in the text field and then click the “OK” button (or press the Enter key) to continue.

Type Regedit in Run Command

You can also access the Registry Editor by typing “regedit” into the taskbar’s search field and selecting the resulting desktop app.

In the Registry Editor, expand the following folders in this order:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE > SOFTWARE > Microsoft > Windows NT > CurrentVersion

In the CurrentVersion folder, select the “Winlogon” entry to show its settings in the panel on the right. Double-click the “DisableCad” entry to edit its values.

Registry Editor Alter Winlogon Setting

In the “Edit DWORD (32-bit) Value” pop-up box, change the Value Data with one of these values:

Click the “OK” button to finish. Restart your PC to save the settings.

Registry Editor Alter Winlogon Value

Note: If you don’t see a “DisableCad” entry in the “Winlogon” settings, right-click on “Winlogon,” select “New” in the pop-up menu, and then click “DWORD (32-bit) Value” in the next list. Name this new DWORD as “DisableCAD” (without the quotes) and change its value.

Registry Editor Create DWORD





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