Taylor Swift Sues Microsoft | Socialnomics


Taylor Swift Sues Microsoft

Taylor Swift tried to sue Microsoft over a chatbot which posted racist messages on Twitter, the president of the tech company has revealed. She was unhappy with the name of its chatbot Tay, meant to interact with 18 to 24-year-olds online, because it was similar to hers. If you don’t remember TayTweets, it’s the Twitter chatbot that turned racist.

TayTweets was controlled by artificial intelligence and was designed to learn from conversations held on social media. But shortly after Tay was launched, it tweeted to say it supported genocide and didn’t believe the holocaust happened – among other things. Microsoft issued an apology and took Tay offline after less than 18-hours of offensive conversations on Twitter.

Taylor and her legal team are pretty strict on people who come too close to the singer and her intellectual property rights.

(Source: BBC)

 

Consumers Waste No Time With iPhone 11 Memes

Rumors of three rear-facing cameras started consumer imaginations clicking before the device came out officially. On Tuesday, the company revealed its next-generation phone at an Apple event in Cupertino, California. iPhone rumors and leaks were everywhere in the days leading up to the event, and the idea that one potential update would include three rear-facing cameras had consumers memeing it up with fake mockups on Twitter.

The idea of three separate cameras put some in mind of a fidget spinner, a stove top, a coconut and even an alien. And some jokes were just about how much the phone is likely to cost. Spoiler: a lot.

(Source: CNET)

 

‘Storm Area 51’ Creator Says He’s Not Going

Area 51 is a highly classified zone around 150 miles from Las Vegas, Nevada, a detachment of the famed Edwards Air Force Base. No one really knows what the base is used for, though it’s speculated to be a location for aircraft development and, as such, Area 51 has become synonymous with alien conspiracies.

In late June a 21-year-old named Mathew Roberts created a public Facebook event titled “Storm Area 51, They Can’t Stop All of Us.” What started off as a joke became a phenomenon, with over 2 million hitting the “going” button. The initially tongue-in-cheek event turned into a real festival, now called Alienstock. The original event even has its own Wikipedia page.

In a separate interview with ABC Arizona, Roberts said he was worried the event would end up being “a disaster.” His co-organizer Frank DiMaggio added: “We don’t have a good feeling about people going out 150 miles into the desert without the resources that they need.”

Will they go through with it?

(Source: CNET)





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